“Crook’s Hollow” by Robert Parker – Book Review

Twenty-five year old Thor Loxley has been estranged from his family for two years after a major rift with his father. Now, inexplicably, someone has attempted to kill him – and very nearly succeeded. His assailant left him with the cryptic message “You should have got on with it.”

Thor is having a relationship with a neighbouring farmer’s daughter. Which would be fine and convenient if it weren’t for the fact that the two families have been enemies for centuries. The feud between the Loxleys and the Crooks began as far back as memory allowed.  His girlfriend, Roisin, seems to return his affection and he wonders whether they will ever be able to have an open relationship in this insular village.

“In a place like Crook’s Hollow, gossip was like currency, passed furtively in shadows and across bright dining tables with the same glee.”

When yet another attempt is made on Thor’s life, he tries to find out who would harbour such animosity against him. He simply has no idea…

Also, for the first time in recent memory, Crook’s Hollow is besieged by a terrific flood. The rising waters spell disaster for many of the farmers and villagers – and for Thor, it just might be the end of him.Also, there are some sleazy property developers hanging around the village. What part, if any, are they playing in Thor’s newfound troubles?

If you like a fast-pasted read, then look no further. The break-neck pace began with the first page and didn’t let up until the last.

Thor Loxley was a likeable fellow, and his dire predicament caused the reader to be interested in how he was going to extricate himself from it. And WHO and WHY someone wanted him dead.

The suspense carried on throughout the book, but the plot was just a bit too ‘over the top‘ for my personal taste. Thor was just too resilient, the action just too far-fetched. It reminded by a bit of some early Dick Francis novels, where the protagonist takes a licking and keeps on ticking…  That being said, it was a compelling read that kept me glued to my Kindle for the duration.

With elements of modern day Romeo and Juliet crossed with the violence of the Hatfield and McCoy family feuds, this is a novel of revenge, greed, and betrayal that will appeal to many – especially those who have a fondness for ‘Die Hard’ style movies.

I received a complimentary digital copy of “Crook’s Hollow” from Black Rose Writing via Edelweiss in the expectation of my review.

ISBN 9781612964591   Pages: 208

Robert Parker is a married father of three, who lives in a village near Manchester, England. The author of the Ben Bracken books A Wanted Man and Morte Point, and the standalone post-Brexit country-noir Crook’s Hollow, he enjoys a rural life on an old pig farm (now minus pigs), writing horrible things between school runs.

He writes full time, as well as organising and attending various author events across the UK – while boxing regularly for charity. Passionate about inspiring a love of the written word in young people, he spends a lot of time in schools across the North West, encouraging literacy, story-telling, creative-writing and how good old fashioned hard work tends to help good things happen.

Follow Robert Parker on Twitter.

About Fictionophile

Fiction reviewer ; Goodreads librarian. Retired library cataloger - more time to read! Loves books, gardening, and red wine. I have been a reviewer member of NetGalley since October 2013. I review titles offered by Edelweiss, and participate in blog tours with TLC Book Tours.
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